Arthritic Pain

Posted by on Apr 28, 2022 in Back pain | Comments Off on Arthritic Pain

Arthritic Pain

Arthritic pain can be caused by the most common form of arthritis: osteoarthritis. However it can also be caused by rheumatoid arthritis, or other less common forms. Different Types of Arthritis The most common cause of arthritic pain is osteoarthritis (OA). This is the form that people often simply refer to as “arthritis”. Unlike other forms, it is not considered an autoimmune condition, and is instead associated with the demand placed on a joint over time. An old injury that led to increased work for a joint, for example, could be a factor in developing OA. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is quite different to OA. Whereas OA typically starts in patients over 40, RA often starts in the 30s. It may follow a traumatic event, whether physically or emotionally traumatic. The small joints are often affected first, such as the hands, feet, and neck. There is some overlap here, as OA may manifest in the hands and spine first too, but when the hip and knee are affected it’s less likely to be the start of RA. There are other forms of arthritis in the same family as RA. Roughly 10% of people with psoriasis go on to develop psoriatic arthritis, which is not necessarily isolated to the areas affected by the skin condition. We also need to be aware of lower back pain that is not what it seems: Ankylosing Spondylitis causes pain and stiffness in the lower back with symptoms beginning in the under 40s. Diagnosis takes an average of 8 years, and early intervention with medication is key to improving quality of life. Diagnosing Arthritic Pain Your case history is the first step in working out the exact cause of your pain. The circumstances under which it started and which joints are affected are important pieces of information. We will ask what makes your symptoms better or worse- good response to ice or anti-inflammatory medication suggests that there is inflammation present, which is more significant in autoimmune form of arthritis. Sometimes patients present with what they think is arthritic pain, but may actually be an injury or soft tissue problem. In your first appointment we will gather all the necessary information to provide you with a diagnosis and treatment plan. Osteopathy for Arthritic Pain Your osteopath is qualified to help you with your arthritic pain. Although we cannot cure autoimmune conditions, we can help with longer term management of these conditions. For osteoarthritis, we may be able to positively affect the condition itself, not just the symptoms. Osteoarthritis is a condition that affects cartilage within a joint. Cartilage has a poor blood supply, so relies on the fluid within the joint to bring in its nutrients and take away its waste. You can think of the cartilage as a washing-up sponge: squeezing and releasing the sponge will help clean it out and allow it to absorb fresh water. If you start to lose joint movement, some of the cartilage won’t get the squeeze and release, so it begins to deteriorate. Your osteopath can help you regain that movement so your body can start to get on top of the cartilage health again. A combination of movement and massage during the appointment, paired with personalised exercises form the typical plan. We can also see if there’s another problem...

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Tips for Pain Free Gardening

Posted by on May 24, 2019 in Back pain | Comments Off on Tips for Pain Free Gardening

Tips for Pain Free Gardening

It’s the bank holiday weekend and the sun will hopefully shine.  Are you planning on hitting the garden?  Here are our top tips to keeping pain free. When the weather starts to improve, many people’s thoughts return to their garden’s.  Every year I treat many people who’ve got a little overzealous with their spring gardening and ended up in pain. So what can you do to help minimise the risk of pain? 1 – Don’t over do it – it’s tempting to get everything done in one day but try to pace yourself over a few days/weekend’s.   Too much activity, too quickly is often seen as a threat to your body and your brain will warn you to back off. 2- Take regular breaks – once you get stuck in, it’s easy for the time to slip by – set a timer on your phone or an egg timer to remind you to take regular breaks. 3 – Keep hydrated – when you take your break don’t forget to grab a glass of water. 4- Avoid prolonged bending – bending isn’t necessarily bad for our backs, but our bodies don’t like being in one position for a prolonged period of time.  Change posture, stand up regularly, move your hips in circles and side to side, do some gentle back-bends etc. 5 – Invest in a good kneeler – your knees will thank you! 6 – Know your limits –  for some jobs it’s just best to get someone else to do it or at least help you....

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Hot and Cold Hydrotherapy

Posted by on Dec 1, 2014 in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Hot and Cold Hydrotherapy

As a general rule, if you have a new injury or a flare up of an exciting condition you should apply ice as soon as possible. The aim of applying ice is to: Reduce bleeding into the tissues Prevent/reduce swelling Reduce muscle spasm and pain Reduce pain by numbing the area and by limiting the effects of swelling   After 24-48 hours if you are finding ice helpful and relieving then you can continue. However, if you are no longer finding ice beneficial you can try alternating hot and cold (see below). How to ice effectively: Apply ice/ice pack as soon as you can following onset of pain. Do not apply an ice pack directly to the skin. Wrap a tea towel or t shirt etc around it, or place on top of a wet flannel. A gel ice pack or wheat bag (follow manufactures instructions) or bag of frozen peas work well. Aim to apply ice for 15-20minutes every 2-4 (waking) hours for 24-48 hours. Whist applying ice check the area every 5 minutes for redness. If the area is red than remove ice pack to prevent ice burn.   Hot and Cold Contrast The aim of hot and cold contrast is to promote circulation, relax tight muscles and reduce pain. For a hot pack, a wheat bag or gel hot pack (follow manufacture instructions), hot water bottle with a cover on or towel around, or a hot wet towel can be used. For cold/ice – a gel pack, ice or bag of frozen peas can be used. Do not apply directly to skin. Apply heat for 3 minutes, followed by 1 minute cold. Repeat 3-5 times. Finish with cold. If you have more time and really like the heat then you can apply heat for 5 minutes then cold for 2minutes. Repeat 3-5 times. Finish with cold. Prolonged direct heat should not be applied. This can have an irritating effect. If you are unsure what to do or you dislike the ice then do not hesitate to contact RNO for advice....

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Understanding Pain

Posted by on Nov 10, 2014 in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Understanding Pain

Experiencing pain can be very scary, especially when we don’t understand the cause. Fear of pain and pain avoidance are not beneficial to recovery, therefore understanding the causes of pain can aid long term recovery.   Here are two great video’s on pain: Understanding Pain: What to do about it. http://youtu.be/RWMKucuejIs   Why Things Hurt by Lorimer Moseley. http://youtu.be/gwd-wLdIHjs For anyone who’s interested in learning more about about pain and chronic pain I highly recommend a book/audio book called Explain Pain by Butler and Moseley. It appears to be quite difficult to get hold of at the moment but worth looking for. Moseley has also done various very imperative TedEx and YouTube videos. Here is a clip about their Audio Book....

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